Sunday, January 28, 2018

For our astroturf

From SurveyUSA comes an interesting quantification of the proxy for in-group impulses that is professional sports. The survey (N = 700) was conducted in the San Diego metro area. In the 2017 NFL season, the one that ends next week, the Chargers moved to Los Angeles.

The survey inquired about fandom. Some 69% of respondents said they were fans of the Chargers last year, but just 32% have remained Chargers fans with the team's move to LA this year. The composition of mercenaries didn't change significantly more from 2016 to 2017 than it did for any other NFL team. More than half of the fans were fans because said hired mercenaries played ten games a year in their metro area instead of ten games in another metro area a couple of hours' drive north.

The siphoning of healthy sentiments by college and professional sports that might otherwise be directed towards civic nationalism (or citizenism) is a theme Steve Sailer has visited on multiple occasions. With 16% of respondents saying the Chargers leaving San Diego "reduced [their] personal happiness a lot" and another 27% saying it "reduced [their] personal happiness a little", it's hard to argue he isn't on to something.

One question concerns what should be done with what was formerly called Qualcomm Stadium when the Chargers played there. The percentages of responses, by race, favoring converting the site into a soccer stadium and converting it into a western campus location of San Diego State Univeristy:


Their priorities are not our priorities:

21 comments:

Anonymous said...

Still too many boomer conservatives watching sportsball.

This country uses taxes to fund sports stadiums, and gives tax "credits" to Hollywood film productions.

The Iraq War was supposed to give us cheap oil, all we get from sportsball is a cheap civic identity.

Joshua Sinistar said...

Hey man just leave that place sit idle. Minorities need to go somewhere when the shit hits the fan. You don't want them out on the street. Let them wait for government cheese. most people cannot go without water for two days and probably only about 6 - 10 days without food. Colleges are already overbuilt and soccer isn't that popular in places with working utilities. Oh sure, you might say Europeans like it, but that's only because they call it Football. I could probably make any game popular if I called it Football.

Anonymous said...

Thanks for referring to the players as "mercenaries". For a long time I've wondered how sports teams or symphony orchestras, for that matter, attract any fan base when they are composed of the best mercenaries the organization can afford. I'd have a lot more interest in a team or orchestra if it consisted of natives or long-time residents of an area. Then it might mean something for an Atlanta entity to beat one from Huntsville.

Jig Bohnson said...

In this case the Hispanics have the right priorities. The very last thing we need is another campus of the Cal State system. They are about to eliminate algebra as a graduation requirement because too many of their students are failing it.

Feryl said...

"Thanks for referring to the players as "mercenaries". For a long time I've wondered how sports teams or symphony orchestras, for that matter, attract any fan base when they are composed of the best mercenaries the organization can afford. I'd have a lot more interest in a team or orchestra if it consisted of natives or long-time residents of an area. Then it might mean something for an Atlanta entity to beat one from Huntsville."

I've heard a lot of (non sports fan) people make this point. But......A given city only produces so many gladiators. Said gladiators are paid (and admired) because of certain attributes of which where you grew up is irrelevant. It wouldn't be entertaining to watch most athletes who only came from a particular area, since most of 'em would be small, slow, and weak.

Also, if we weren't paying these guys to out-macho each other within the confines of sport rules, what would they be doing? Better to channel their aggression towards sports than to have them be low-life thugs in "the real world".

Audacious Epigone said...

Joshua,

soccer isn't that popular in places with working utilities. Oh sure, you might say Europeans like it, but that's only because they call it Football. I could probably make any game popular if I called it Football.

Ha!

Anon,

I recall a few years ago someone--I think it was HBD Chick, though I'm not certain--looked at Super Bowl rosters and found that players on each team were basically no more likely to have been from the state the city they were playing for was in than a random subset of the entire American population would have been. In other words, there is virtually no correlation between where a future pro sports player grows up and where he ends up playing professionally.

That's probably not quite the case in second-tier pro sports or college athletics, but at the highest levels they are all mercenaries, every single one.

Jig Bohnson,

Fair enough.

Feryl said...

Soccer is amusing enough to watch every 4 years or so. But the athletic requirements are so rudimentary (non-Africans from the global South can compete!) and the scoring is low. So there's a lot of randomness and hand-wringing by fans of every team since most matches are so technically close, and beyond displays of hand eye coordination/concentration and stamina you don't really see a lot of terribly athletic feats compared to other team sports. Not when you consider just how much time there is to make plays in soccers. Basketball and hockey are superficially similar to hockey, but since those sports take place on smaller fields and you can use your hands to control the scoring object, they are way more exciting to watch. And even in basketball, the likelihood of physical contact, the means by which you control the ball, gaining leverage for rebounds, and dodging opponents on a small field of play all require a decent amount of lower and upper body strength. On average, soccer players are probably far weaker than players in the 4 primary North American sports. Neymar looks laughably nerdy, even in comparison to many basketball point guards.

Downplaying the physicality of basketball is common among American sports fans, but it practically is a blood sport compared to soccer, in which physical contact of any kind is strictly policed.

Anonymous said...

Of the half-dozen white boomer conservantines I know, all but one has overcome his outrage at the "taking the knee" thing and has returned to his feetsball fetish.

Audacious Epigone said...

Feryl,

I've been to exactly one professional soccer game. At 80 minutes in, it was 0-0.

Wrt games being technically close, Steve Sailer has mentioned how so many games ending in ties makes a lot of unathletic countries (i.e. the the non-sub-Saharan-African-Global-South) feel good about themselves. They're like Hector fighting Ajax to a stalemate. Sure, they'll eventually get crushed by Achilles, but they'll have hung in there for awhile.

Anon,

It's been a couple of years since I've watched anything more than parts of games I've caught in social situations, but I am interested to see whether or not kneeling occurs on Sunday. That could reignite their outrage.

Anonymous said...

It will be interesting to watch if the Indian mascot kulturkampf restarts. Sportsball has to prove how "woke" it is to get the "diverse" audience.

The Cleveland metro went hard for Trump in '16, but its sports teams are showing that globalist capital matters more than any civic loyalty.

Anonymous said...

http://www.cleveland.com/tribe/index.ssf/2018/01/cleveland_indians_58.html

Thousands of boomer voices cried out in terror, as their corporate voice was suddenly silenced.

Anonymous said...

Why are Americans so lacking in self-confidence that their major sports are ones hardly anybody else plays?

And if you want high scores, there's cricket, the most civilised sport.

Martin

Wency said...

On the topic of "mercenaries", Seinfeld pointed out that we're basically rooting for clothes:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=we-L7w1K5Zo

He seems to be a sports fan regardless. In fairness, ordinary Americans switch cities a fair amount too. Players do seem to get popularity bonus points for staying with the same team longer, just as regular people who move around less are able to make more links to the community.

But the elimination of the mercenary aspect is the essential appeal of the Olympics, isn't it? We watch a bunch of events that we'd normally never bother with because now the flag is involved and the teams are much less arbitrary.

The flag is even enough to make Americans watch soccer. I'd personally take the most boring Olympic event over the World Cup any day. I've never sat through a 0-0 tie in synchronized swimming.

People are arguing that soccer is popular because it makes certain countries more athletically competitive, but that doesn't seem to fit the facts. Take Russia: they know about hockey, they're pretty good at hockey, they can play hockey outside for a fair chunk of the year, but they prefer soccer, which they're terrible at.

My theory: soccer popularity -- like the similarly inexplicable popularity of cats -- is propagated by a toxoplasma-like infection in the brain. It thrives in the global South but the jet stream carries it to Europe as well.

Audacious Epigone said...

Decades ago now the Chiefs (Kansas City) discontinued the stadium-led "tomahawk chop" for the same 'anti-racist' reason. AFAIK it still happens at virtually every home game, though. It'll be interesting to see how many fans show up with visible Wahoos on their clothing. Will the networks try not to show it?

Audacious Epigone said...

Martin,

Because the US is a TV culture. Soccer and cricket are extremely boring to watch on TV. (American) football is perfect for watching on TV (with commercials) and basketball is perfectly paced for live spectating.

Wency,

Ha! Thanks.

Anonymous said...

...you utterly fail to mention the near identical levels of support amongst whites, blacks, and Asians for the college campus.

socalmike said...

The breakdown of party affiliation: 24% R, 34% D, and 30% I. That'll affect the results, too.

As a former SD resident (grew up in one of the suburbs), I have great memories of the stadium. But it's old.

I think some of the residents think that when the Spanos family sells the team, someday, that they'll move back to SD, and the stadium will still be there for them. That ain't gonna happen.

The other issue is SDSU football - where would they play? They certainly don't draw as many fans as the Chargers, but they do need a place to play. Maybe tear it down, build a western campus, and build a new smaller stadium.

Audacious Epigone said...

socalmike,

Thanks for the local perspective.

So we know how you would've answered!

Feryl said...

"Because the US is a TV culture. Soccer and cricket are extremely boring to watch on TV. (American) football is perfect for watching on TV (with commercials) and basketball is perfectly paced for live spectating."

America's sports were developed without TV in mind; it's basically incidental that these sports were well-suited to TV. Football rapidly grew in popularity in the mid-late 70's, and that's likely due to America growing more competitive (player size began to noticeably rise in the late 70's). Boxing also became more popular in the 70's, though the inherently thuggish and sleazy nature of boxing seemed to get on people's nerves eventually and boxing has slowly faded into popular irrelevance, with the infamous Mike Tyson ear bite being the shark jump moment. At least football fans can celebrate the camarderie of a team sport; with boxing (and MMA) it's just two gorillas blasting each other, And parents didn't mind Boomers and X-er children playing football, whereas young X-ers and of course Millennials have been socialized to disdain and avoid boxing by their parents. And high school and college football serve as mock wars between polities, complete with full and dehumanizing body armor. In fighting sports, the competitors only wear rudimentary gear, because after all, the fighter's knuckles have to be protected. There's something savage and unsettling about nearly naked men (usually men....) being pitted against each other with nobody around to help.

Feryl said...

WRT mock war aspect of sports, soccer and American football are well suited to this due to the size of the field and the large number of on field personnel and thus overall roster. Baseball is too cerebral and deliberate to get your adrenaline flowing, and the team on offense is only permitted to have one-three people on the field. Basketball and hockey take place indoors and have smaller rosters than football. I think that a sport needs to be played outdoors for full primal warfare effect.

Audacious Epigone said...

Feryl,

The last contact sport I played regularly was Australian Rules football, and I concur with the observations in that last post in their entirety.