Thursday, February 13, 2014

Presidents, of all people, shouldn't notice things

Writes some Cathedral clone (via Steve Sailer):
[Nixon] was racist in the sense that he subscribed to an actual taxonomy and hierarchy of race—the idea that different groups possess inherent qualities. Asians are smart and industrious. Jews are crafty but lack moral fiber, and so on.
SAT math scores, by race:


From the GSS, average wordsum score by religious affiliation and the percentage of respondents from each affiliation who find it either "not wrong" or only "a bit wrong" for a person to hide some of his income in order to avoid paying income taxes on it:

ReligionWordsum%Taxcheat
Protestant5.8913.3
Catholic6.0316.2
Jewish7.3224.3
None6.3625.0
Other5.8218.5

Additionally, 'ethnic' Jews are more likely than others to self-identify as not having any religious affiliation than people raised in families of other religious persuasions are.

Nixon was racist in the sense that he subscribed to his own lying eyes told him.

GSS variables used: RELIG(1)(2)(3)(4)(5-13), WORDSUM, TAXCHEAT(1-2)(3-4)

2 comments:

Anonymous said...

Facts are racist!

- Apollyon

Anonymous said...

This all being said, I would note that on the GSS, when contrasting folks who give their race as White and who state that they are one of the Jewish varieties versus non-Jewish, the Jews tend to score either higher or the same on most of the questions of how trustworthy they view others to be.

Using the variables rjew (a recoded variable), race (1), fair shows a slightly higher Jewish mean compared to non-Jewish Whites.

Givchrty is a variable that shows a positive bias towards Jews. (Fewer Jews divorced also).

I'm not so much of the opinion that Nixon didn't notice things, but perhaps that he didn't notice enough things. E.g. "Asians are smart and industrious." certainly, but you also need to notice how and when they are (and it's not always rosy).

Stereotyping can be a "war on noticing" of its own sort, if certain dogmatic stereotypes prevent other insights from taking hold.