Tuesday, June 18, 2013

The obese eat weight loss up

Obesity rates by state:


And google search indices for "weight loss" by the same:


The correlation between the two is a rigorous .77 (p = .00*), a remarkably strong relationship for such a measurement, and at the state level to boot.

Candy man tempting the thoughts of a sweet tooth tortured by weight loss--well, at least it's not for a lack of trying. Or a lack of expressing at least a passing internet interest, anyway. Or even an excess of intelligence. If nothing else, they have the Dream.

Advice gleaned from a longitudinal study with a sample size of one: Cut the carbs, especially sugars and anything wheat-based, then eat to satiation without counting calories, points, or gil. Lift heavy things, and not just with the chest and biceps--get everything involved. Everything. Drink lots of water and don't drink much of anything else. Get seven hours of sleep a night. Have sex three or four times a week (really, moderation is golden here).

* 5.01^-11, more precisely.

5 comments:

David H. Fucktrelle, Male Feminist Extraordinair (tm) said...

oh, too bad all those feminist cookies are high in calories an low in nutrition....

A. Carrick Bend said...

Plug my data into your longitudinal study of one. Started a similar approach to eating and exercise 6 years ago. It works. I finally got off the lose and regain weight roller coaster. The human body, especially mine, is not designed to deal with the carbs and sugars that make up such a disproportionate percentage of today's American diet.

JayMan said...

Not surprising. Obviously, people with weight problems are most interested in losing weight.

It's worth noting that that map doesn't tell the whole story. You need to separate it by race. The obesity in the South is mostly drive by Blacks. See here (A Fat World – With a Fat Secret? | JayMan's Blog).

Further, it's not clear that the paleo/low carb diet works for everyone. What is even more clear is that all studies of the diet (and any diet) generate poor long-term results, apparently because of inability to stick to the diet. There is no reasonable expectation that this will change en masse any time soon.

Obesity is easier avoided that treated once attained. And even the former is not all that easy in this world, if that's any indication of the situation.

Audacious Epigone said...

Jayman,

I haven't waded deeply enough into the data on the relationship between diet and health to make any empirical pronouncements. But I'm a convert based on personal experience (in terms of quality of life, not necessarily quantity of life, a question for which I'm comfortable suspending judgment), and I really haven't heard any personal accounts contradicting my own. To the extent that people I've known have had difficulties with paleo, it's in being able to stick to it, not that it doesn't have the 'promised' benefits--weight loss, more energy, fewer feelings of hunger, digestive issues, etc.

Audacious Epigone said...

*fewer* digestive issues, that is