Friday, December 14, 2012

Holocaust? Beaver never heard of it

Writes Steve in a recent Taki's column:
A more general discovery was the wide usefulness of Israel’s strategy in 1967: Go on the offensive. This military triumph infused American Jews with new confidence. Before the Six-Day War, the Holocaust was only occasionally mentioned. It was depressing and alarming to admit that your people had recently been the victims of the worst massacre ever. But after Israel’s show of force, the Holocaust became a staple in American media.
What to do when one of your intellectual heroes utters something oh so controversial, and about Jews of all groups? Prove he's correct, that's what:



10 comments:

Anonymous said...

thats only because the very term "holocaust" was only coined in the 70s. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Names_of_the_Holocaust

derek sutton said...

Everything left of, oh say, 1945 is pretty much irrelevant I'd say.

Noah172 said...

It's all well and good to talk about the culture of critique and the Zionist Lobby -- I do plenty of it -- but, bottom line, if white goyim did not feel guilty about the Holocaust, much of the political and social trends that we in alt-right circles complain about would have never arisen in the first place, or would have faded quickly, or would have had much less impact. Peter Brimelow gets this insight: the very first sentence of Alien Nation calls America's immigration disaster "Hitler's revenge".

Neat experiment: next time the Holocaust comes up in a conversation, try asking your interlocutor how many people (don't say "Jews") died in the Holocaust. The correct (ballpark) answer is 11 million, but most people will answer "6 million," the number of Jews killed, because that is almost always what is talked about in the media and the schools. All those gypsies, Soviet and Polish POWs, anti-Nazi political opponents, Jehovah's Witnesses, homosexuals, handicapped, and others hardly exist in the collective memory.

And don't get me started on every other genocide of the last ~100 years. Holodomor, anyone? 3-8 million starved to death in less than a year(!); one would think that Hollywood might find that fitting material for at least one lousy film, but I guess that they are otherwise occupied...

Anonymous said...

The idea that the Holocaust (or whatever it used to be called) did not have a prominent role in American consciousness until the 1970s or so is not original to Sailer but was the thesis of Peter Novick's book The Holocaust in American Life.

Audacious Epigone said...

Anon,

Combine the "Final Solution" with "Holocaust", though, and the frequency of usage pretty much stays the same.

Aeoli Pera said...

The quote was copy/pasted incorrectly. The final statement is chopped off.

Audacious Epigone said...

AP,

Thanks, fixed it.

Saint Louis said...

I was in high school and college from 1994 to 2002. I felt like I never heard the end of Holocaust talk. Turns out my perception was right.

Steve Sailer said...

So, for Holocaust with a capital H, there's an inflection point around 1975, and a peak around 2002.



Anonymous said...

if white goyim did not feel guilty about the Holocaust


What a bizarre proposition. As a "white goyim" I bear less "guilt" for the Holocaust then the average Jew does. And that's not to say that the average Jew bears a lot of guilt - just that I have zero.