Sunday, August 28, 2011

AE in the WSJ

... via an op/ed (fourth paragraph, referencing this post) by City Journal editor, author, and Manhattan Institute senior fellow Steven Malanga on the disconnect between the leftist advocacy and financing provided by union leadership and the sentiments of far more centrist due-paying, rank-and-file union members.


10 comments:

Olave d'Estienne said...

Do you mean you got mentioned/quoted in the WSJ? I can't read that article since I don't pay immigration traitors, but if so, congratulations.

Ed Tom Kowalsky said...

Congrats, AE. Hopefully more good pub will come your way.

Audacious Epigone said...

Olave,

Yeah, in hard copy, not just online. I believe the opinion pages are freely accessible. I'm still able to view it when I log out.

Apparently the editorial board doesn't do too much source checking, because I don't think they'd let a blog like this past the gatekeeper. Or, less cynically, they give guest editorialists a good deal of freedom in the pieces they submit.

silly girl said...

Very interesting comment at the article:


"the closed shop union model is a fundamental violation of our constitutional rights, the freedom to associate, a specifically enumerated right, unlike the non-existent right to collective bargaining."

Can someone explain this a little?

Audacious Epigone said...

SG,

Unless it's a public sector union, I don't see closed shop agreements as a violation of any constitutional right, since the employer is freely entering into agreement with the union. I see no voluntary restriction on free association here, anymore than I do with an employer using physical appearance or IQ as a hiring filter.

Jokah Macpherson said...

Congratulations on the citation. Did the author tell you ahead of time he was using it or was this a surprise?

Audacious Epigone said...

Jokah,

Thanks. We exchanged a few emails about a month back as he was working on the piece, so I had a heads-up.

Anonymous said...

"I don't see closed shop agreements as a violation of any constitutional right, since the employer is freely entering into agreement with the union."

Okay, but the employee? Is he freely entering? What about his right to association?

Audacious Epigone said...

Anon,

The stock answer is that he is free to walk away from both the employer and the union.

hbd chick said...

cool! (^_^)