Wednesday, May 30, 2007

Public steadfast in opposition to Senate amnesty

The supercilious condescension and moral posturing of political elites who are pushing S1348 are finding the American public to be intractable:
Overall, despite a major push by the President and others over the past week, support for the Senate bill has not increased at all. In polling conducted last night (Tuesday, May 29), 26% of voters favor passage of the bill. That’s unchanged from the 26% support found in polling conducted the previous Monday and Tuesday. Forty-eight percent (48%) of voters remain opposed.
Most Americans correctly believe a repeat of the 1986 amnesty, albeit on a larger scale, will have similar consequences to that bill. Namely, they think it will increase illegal immigration:

The latest Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey found that just 16% of American voters believe illegal immigration will decline if the Senate bill is passed. Seventy-four percent (74%) disagree. That figure includes 41% who believe the Senate bill will actually lead to an increase in illegal immigration.
As is standard in the immigration debate, the more informed one is, the less likely he is to support the open borders amnesty:

Eighty-one percent (81%) of American voters are closely following news stories about the issue, including 37% who are following it Very Closely. Those with the highest interest in the issue oppose the legislation by a 3-to-1 margin (69% to 23%). By a 55% to 15% margin, those following the story Very Closely believe the bill will lead to increased levels of illegal immigration.
In the national poll Rasmussen conducted last week, 72% of those surveyed stated the primary need for tougher enforcement. Overwhelmingly, Americans do not buy the non sequitur that somehow tougher enforcement, greater punitions for employers, and a wall along the border are impossible unless the 12 to 20 million-plus illegal immigrants already in the US are amnestied.

Political partisans on both sides, even if they are opposed to several aspects of the bill, are apparently more likely to subordinate their own concerns for the (perceived in the case of Republicans) political benefit of their parties:

Unaffiliated voters are now more opposed to the bill than either Republicans or Democrats. Among those who don’t identify with either of the major parties, 22% support the Senate bill while 57% are opposed.

It may also be that party members tend to get their information from sources sympathetic to the political party they support, and are less hostile to the bill in light of the spin they're receiving about it.

How refreshing to see polling of this nature done. Instead of composing questions that misrepresent what the legislation will actually do, and then using the results of such a sloppy proxy as if they indicate support for a bill that wasn't asked about, instead of grouping several potentially unpalpable questions into a single, binary question when inquiring about greater restriction while separating questions into small chunks when inquiring about support for 'comprehensive' reform, Rasmussen is simply asking respondents whether or not they support the Senate bill. And the respondents are thunderously saying they do not.

Rasmussen also helps dispel the myth that because most Americans say they'd be willing to support 'comprehensive' reform so long as it guaranteed tougher enforcement and greater future restriction, it is also what most Americans feel is most ideal. While 72% feel tougher enforcement is of paramount importance, only 29% think some sort of legalization is of great importance.

The pragmatic 'comprise' most Americans are willing to go along with is that which stops the unfettered inundation of the US with impoverished, culturally-backward, uneducated, intellectually uncurious, low IQ, diseased Hispanic hordes. They're willing to sacrifice a little to make that a reality. It doesn't mean they want an amnesty. Tamar Jacoby knows that, and it's why she is too pusillanimous to craft questions that actually ask it.

1 comment:

the wily marmot said...

The pragmatic 'comprise' most Americans are willing to go along with is that which stops the unfettered inundation of the US with impoverished, culturally-backward, uneducated, intellectually uncurious, low IQ, diseased Hispanic hordes.

I hope the SPLC never finds out who you are.